Database.use.hdl: https://cris.mruni.eu/cris/handle/007/21382
Now showing 1 - 7 of 7
  • research article
    Quantitative Science Studies., p. 1-33.
    Books are an important output in many fields of research. However, they pose a significant challenge for research assessment systems, partly because of the limited availability of information to support the assessment of books. To inform book assessment practices, I present a systematic examination of the ISBN Manual and the Global Register of Publishers (GRP). I evaluate the extent to which these two sources can be used to determine the genre and publisher of a book as well as the country in which a book was issued. My analysis focuses on books submitted to the research assessment systems in Lithuania and the UK from 2008 to 2020. I show how the ISBN Manual captures the complex interactions between publishers, their imprints, and other organisations active in academic publishing, revealing the pitfalls of measuring books’ quality by their publisher’s prestige. The results also indicate that the ISBN standard provides no basis for the book genres mandated by research assessment systems in some countries. Finally, I demonstrate how the ISBN Manual and metadata accumulated in the GRP are convenient tools for designers of research assessment systems and are suitable for identifying ISBN registrants and performing bibliometric analysis.
      22WOS© IF 6.4WOS© AIF 1.2Scopus© SNIP 3.37
  • research article
    Butkutė, Lina
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    Mortelmans, Dimitri
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    Journal of Divorce & Remarriage. Philadephia : Taylor & Francis, 2023, 00, 00., p. 1-30
    While research has focused on self-concept before or after marriage dissolution, very little research has investigated how individuals understand and evaluate themselves during the longer-lasting and usually highly conflictual divorce process. Qualitative interview data with Lithuanians 6 months or more into their divorce processes suggest that divorcees experience marital dissolution as an interchange of three main processes: losing valued self-parts, a (re)birth of a more valued self, and hanging-self as being stuck in ongoing uncertainty with a need to protect valued parts of oneself. The theoretical and practical implications of these research findings are discussed.
      1Scopus© SNIP 0.853
  • research article
    Li, Lijun
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    Serido, Joyce
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    Sorgente, Angela
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    Lep, Žan
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    Zhang, Yue
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    Fonseca, Gabriela
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    Crespo, Carla
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    Relvas, Ana Paula
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    Zupančič, Maja
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    Lanz, Margherita
    Journal of Happiness Studies. Dordrecht : Springer, 2023, 00, 00., p. 1-4
    Young adulthood (18-30 years old) is a crucial period due to its developmental tasks such as career establishment and financial independence. However, young adults’ relative lack of resources makes them vulnerable to employment disruptions (job loss and income loss), which may have both immediate and long-term effects on their financial wellbeing and mental health. The economic impact of COVID-19 restrictions resulted in an increase in unemployment and a decrease in income worldwide, especially for young adults. This study examined to what extent and how job loss and income loss due to the pandemic influenced young adults’ perception of their present financial wellbeing, future financial wellbeing, and psychological wellbeing by using cross-sectional survey data collected from six countries (China, Italy, Lithuania, Portugal, Slovenia, and the United States). Results showed that the impact of income loss and job loss on all three types of wellbeing were mediated by young adults’ negative perception of the COVID-19 lockdown restriction (i.e., perceived as a misfortune). Cross-country differences existed in the key variables. The association between employment disruptions, young adults’ perception of the COVID-19 lockdown restriction, and wellbeing were equivalent across countries except China. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.
      9WOS© IF 4.6WOS© AIF 3.4Scopus© SNIP 2.296
  • research article
    Berrocal, Martina
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    Kranert, Michael
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    Attolino, Paola
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    Bonatti Santos, Júlio Antonio
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    Garcia Santamaria, Sara
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    Henaku, Nancy
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    Lezou Koffi, Aimée Danielle
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    Marziani, Camilla
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    Olivera Pérez, Dasniel
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    Rajandran, Kumaran
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    Salamurović, Aleksandra
    Humanities and Social Sciences Communications. London : Springer Nature, 2021, vol. 8, iss. 1, 128., p. 1-12
    The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a unique global experience, arousing both exclusionary nationalistic and inclusionary responses of solidarity. This article aims to explore the discursive and linguistic means by which the COVID-19 pandemic, as a macro-event, has been translated into local micro-events. The analysis studies the global pandemic through the initial statements of 29 leading political actors across four continents. The aim is to examine discursive constructions of solidarity and nationalism through the social representation of inclusion/exclusion of in-, out-, and affiliated groups. The comparative analysis is based on the theoretical and methodological framework of the socio-cognitive approach to critical discourse analysis and is informed by argumentation theory and nationalism studies. The results of our analysis suggest that leaders have constructed the virus as the main outgroup through the metaphors of the pandemic-as-war and the pandemic-as-movement which have entered the national space. Faced with this threat, these speeches have discursively constructed the nation-as-a-team as the main in-group and prioritized (1) a vertical type of solidarity based on nationhood and according to governmental plans; (2) exclusionary solidarity against rule-breakers; (3) horizontal solidarity that is both intergenerational and among family members, and (4) transnational solidarity. It is not by chance that the world stands as a relevant affiliated group that needs to forcibly collaborate in order to face the main outgroup, the virus itself. A major consensus has been found in constructing the out-group. In contrast, the linguistic and discursive constructions of in-groups and their affiliates display a greater variation, depending upon the prevalent discursive practices and social context within different countries.
      1WOS© IF 2.731WOS© AIF 5.134Scopus© SNIP 1.289
  • research article
    Journal of psychology and behavioral science. [New York] : American Research Institute for Policy Development, 2015, vol. 3, no. 1., p. 50-60
    Therefore, regarding the suicides with help, the opinion that a person who chooses death can reflect on his situation constructively, and he is still capable to experience positive emotions, is not evidence – based. Nonetheless, supplementary research is needed to explore further the different factors contributing to unwillingness to live which is a sign of diminished psychological wellbeing.
  • research article
    International journal of philosophy and theology. New York : American Research Institute for Policy Development, 2014, vol. 2, no. 2., p. 23-32
    The paper analyzes the awareness of the power of language in mythical culture relating pre-theoretical to theoretical thinking. Emphasis on the power of word in a myth and its identification with the essence of thing give prominence to the usage of names. The word is understood as the tool of creation and the element giving birth to the world and its order. Language for the ancient man provides both the cognitive basis and the examples of practical behavior. This paper makes the assumption that the inherent belief of the pre-theoretical thinking in the exclusive power of language to represent things determined the insight into the language as the tool for revealing the essence of world in theoretical thinking. The creative power of language became the starting point for the philosophical analysis of the relation between things and names. Philosophical thought while transforming the belief inherent to pre-theoretical thinking in exceptional powers of language into the theoretical analysis of the suitability of language for knowing, raised the problem of the relationship between the world of things and the world of language which is analyzed in philosophical theories from Plato to Wittgenstein, Popper or Feyerabend.
  • research article;
    Daukantaitė, Daiva
    Journal of happiness studies : an interdisciplinary forum on subjective well-being. Dordrecht : Springer, 2012, vol. 13, iss. 1., p. 1-16
    The focus of the present study lies on optimism and its relationships to the components of subjective well-being, i.e. global life satisfaction, positive affect and negative affect. We investigated the direct and indirect (via affectivity) effects of optimism on global life satisfaction in the Swedish middleaged women at two time points (age 43 and 49), and in the Lithuanian middle-aged women. For this purpose, structural equation modelling was used and the fit indices were compared between two cognitive-affective models. The best fitting model suggests that the direct effect of optimism on global life satisfaction is stronger than that via affectivity. The result was found both in the Swedish sample at two time points and in the Lithuanian sample where the indirect effect was very low and insignificant. The indirect effect via negative affectivity was significant in the Swedish samples at both time points while the indirect effect via positive affectivity was low but significant only in the Swedish sample at age 43. In further analyses we studied the stability of optimism and the components of general SWB in the Swedish sample over a six-year period and a mean difference in optimism in two samples of women, Swedish and Lithuanian. Data analyses showed varying stability of the studied concepts with the highest stability coefficient being for negative affect and the lowest being for global life satisfaction. Cross-cultural analysis of mean difference in optimism showed that the Swedish women at age 43 reported significantly higher optimism as compared to their Lithuanian counterparts.
    WOS© IF 1.462WOS© AIF 1.462Scopus© SNIP 1.412