Database.use.hdl: https://cris.mruni.eu/cris/handle/007/21382
Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • research article
    Quantitative Science Studies., p. 1-33.
    Books are an important output in many fields of research. However, they pose a significant challenge for research assessment systems, partly because of the limited availability of information to support the assessment of books. To inform book assessment practices, I present a systematic examination of the ISBN Manual and the Global Register of Publishers (GRP). I evaluate the extent to which these two sources can be used to determine the genre and publisher of a book as well as the country in which a book was issued. My analysis focuses on books submitted to the research assessment systems in Lithuania and the UK from 2008 to 2020. I show how the ISBN Manual captures the complex interactions between publishers, their imprints, and other organisations active in academic publishing, revealing the pitfalls of measuring books’ quality by their publisher’s prestige. The results also indicate that the ISBN standard provides no basis for the book genres mandated by research assessment systems in some countries. Finally, I demonstrate how the ISBN Manual and metadata accumulated in the GRP are convenient tools for designers of research assessment systems and are suitable for identifying ISBN registrants and performing bibliometric analysis.
      22WOS© IF 6.4WOS© AIF 1.2Scopus© SNIP 3.37
  • research article;
    Kaminsky, Oleg
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    Teslenko, Tetiana
    Economics. Ecology. Socium., p. 83-95.
    Introduction. The study of economic security is relevant due to strengthening competition in the world market and military conflicts, which are becoming critical tasks for the state. Studying economic security makes it possible to identify the problematic aspects of a country's economy, find solutions, and develop strategies to ensure a sustainable investment policy. The specifics of changes in organizational models associated with digitalization also transform investment management systems. The most significant digital changes affect economic security, as the high openness of companies contributes to the emergence of various threats and risks to their activities. Therefore, it is essential to study the problems related to the risks of digital transformation within the framework of economic security management in the investment provision of Ukraine. Aim and tasks.  The purpose of the study is to analyse problems and develop a recommendation for assessing the level of economic security when developing investment projects, taking into account the risks of digital transformation, for better preparation for future projects of post-war reconstruction in Ukraine. The results. This study developed a conceptual model for assessing the level of economic security, which includes the systematization of critical indicators of economic security and the organization of ensuring end-to-end transparency of information during the implementation of investment projects for the post-war reconstruction of Ukraine based on intelligent technologies. Software for assessing economic security using machine learning methods is proposed, which will allow forecasting the state of the enterprise's economic security for the entire implementation period of the investment project. Conclusions. This research proved that an enterprise's economic security is a complex and integral economic concept that requires studying the influence of several external and internal factors. Therefore, the established approach to assessing the state of economic security should cover all current investment processes and risks that arise in the context of the digitalization of enterprises, influencing the choice of critical indicators. Post-war reconstruction should be based on the modernization of the economy by improving the security of the business environment (reducing corruption, ensuring private property rights and strengthening the security of business activities) and the transition to a digital society.
      5WOS© IF 0.3WOS© AIF 1.75
  • research article
    Li, Lijun
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    Serido, Joyce
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    Sorgente, Angela
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    Lep, Žan
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    Zhang, Yue
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    Fonseca, Gabriela
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    Crespo, Carla
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    Relvas, Ana Paula
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    Zupančič, Maja
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    Lanz, Margherita
    Journal of Happiness Studies. Dordrecht : Springer, 2023, 00, 00., p. 1-4
    Young adulthood (18-30 years old) is a crucial period due to its developmental tasks such as career establishment and financial independence. However, young adults’ relative lack of resources makes them vulnerable to employment disruptions (job loss and income loss), which may have both immediate and long-term effects on their financial wellbeing and mental health. The economic impact of COVID-19 restrictions resulted in an increase in unemployment and a decrease in income worldwide, especially for young adults. This study examined to what extent and how job loss and income loss due to the pandemic influenced young adults’ perception of their present financial wellbeing, future financial wellbeing, and psychological wellbeing by using cross-sectional survey data collected from six countries (China, Italy, Lithuania, Portugal, Slovenia, and the United States). Results showed that the impact of income loss and job loss on all three types of wellbeing were mediated by young adults’ negative perception of the COVID-19 lockdown restriction (i.e., perceived as a misfortune). Cross-country differences existed in the key variables. The association between employment disruptions, young adults’ perception of the COVID-19 lockdown restriction, and wellbeing were equivalent across countries except China. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.
      9WOS© IF 4.6WOS© AIF 3.4Scopus© SNIP 2.296
  • research article
    Zhao, Wenwu
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    Yin, Caichun
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    Hua, Ting
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    Meadows, Michael E.
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    Li, Yan
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    Liu, Yanxu
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    Cherubini, Francesco
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    Fu, Bojie
    Humanities and Social Sciences Communications. London : Springer Nature, 2022, vol. 9, iss. 1, ARTN 258., p. 1821-1840
    The COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose substantial challenges to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Exploring systematic SDG strategies is urgently needed to aid recovery from the pandemic and reinvigorate global SDG actions. Based on available data and comprehensive analysis of the literature, this paper highlights ongoing challenges facing the SDGs, identifies the effects of COVID-19 on SDG progress, and proposes a systematic framework for promoting the achievement of SDGs in the post-pandemic era. Progress towards attaining the SDGs was already lagging behind even before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Inequitable distribution of food–energy–water resources and environmental crises clearly threaten SDG implementation. Evidently, there are gaps between the vision for SDG realization and actual capacity that constrain national efforts. The turbulent geopolitical environment, spatial inequities, and trade-offs limit the effectiveness of SDG implementation. The global public health crisis and socio-economic downturn under COVID-19 have further impeded progress toward attaining the SDGs. Not only has the pandemic delayed SDG advancement in general, but it has also amplified spatial imbalances in achieving progress, undermined connectivity, and accentuated anti-globalization sentiment under lockdowns and geopolitical conflicts. Nevertheless, positive developments in technology and improvement in environmental conditions have also occurred. In reflecting on the overall situation globally, it is recommended that post-pandemic SDG actions adopt a “Classification–Coordination–Collaboration” framework. Classification facilitates both identification of the current development status and the urgency of SDG achievement aligned with national conditions. Coordination promotes domestic/international and inter-departmental synergy for short-term recovery as well as long-term development. Cooperation is key to strengthening economic exchanges, promoting technological innovation, and building a global culture of sustainable development that is essential if the endeavor of achieving the SDGs is to be successful. Systematic actions are urgently needed to get the SDG process back on track.
    WOS© IF 3.5WOS© AIF 1.9Scopus© SNIP 1.62
  • research article
    Berrocal, Martina
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    Kranert, Michael
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    Attolino, Paola
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    Bonatti Santos, Júlio Antonio
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    Garcia Santamaria, Sara
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    Henaku, Nancy
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    Lezou Koffi, Aimée Danielle
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    Marziani, Camilla
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    Olivera Pérez, Dasniel
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    Rajandran, Kumaran
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    Salamurović, Aleksandra
    Humanities and Social Sciences Communications. London : Springer Nature, 2021, vol. 8, iss. 1, 128., p. 1-12
    The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a unique global experience, arousing both exclusionary nationalistic and inclusionary responses of solidarity. This article aims to explore the discursive and linguistic means by which the COVID-19 pandemic, as a macro-event, has been translated into local micro-events. The analysis studies the global pandemic through the initial statements of 29 leading political actors across four continents. The aim is to examine discursive constructions of solidarity and nationalism through the social representation of inclusion/exclusion of in-, out-, and affiliated groups. The comparative analysis is based on the theoretical and methodological framework of the socio-cognitive approach to critical discourse analysis and is informed by argumentation theory and nationalism studies. The results of our analysis suggest that leaders have constructed the virus as the main outgroup through the metaphors of the pandemic-as-war and the pandemic-as-movement which have entered the national space. Faced with this threat, these speeches have discursively constructed the nation-as-a-team as the main in-group and prioritized (1) a vertical type of solidarity based on nationhood and according to governmental plans; (2) exclusionary solidarity against rule-breakers; (3) horizontal solidarity that is both intergenerational and among family members, and (4) transnational solidarity. It is not by chance that the world stands as a relevant affiliated group that needs to forcibly collaborate in order to face the main outgroup, the virus itself. A major consensus has been found in constructing the out-group. In contrast, the linguistic and discursive constructions of in-groups and their affiliates display a greater variation, depending upon the prevalent discursive practices and social context within different countries.
      1WOS© IF 2.731WOS© AIF 5.134Scopus© SNIP 1.289
  • research article;
    Daukantaitė, Daiva
    Journal of happiness studies : an interdisciplinary forum on subjective well-being. Dordrecht : Springer, 2012, vol. 13, iss. 1., p. 1-16
    The focus of the present study lies on optimism and its relationships to the components of subjective well-being, i.e. global life satisfaction, positive affect and negative affect. We investigated the direct and indirect (via affectivity) effects of optimism on global life satisfaction in the Swedish middleaged women at two time points (age 43 and 49), and in the Lithuanian middle-aged women. For this purpose, structural equation modelling was used and the fit indices were compared between two cognitive-affective models. The best fitting model suggests that the direct effect of optimism on global life satisfaction is stronger than that via affectivity. The result was found both in the Swedish sample at two time points and in the Lithuanian sample where the indirect effect was very low and insignificant. The indirect effect via negative affectivity was significant in the Swedish samples at both time points while the indirect effect via positive affectivity was low but significant only in the Swedish sample at age 43. In further analyses we studied the stability of optimism and the components of general SWB in the Swedish sample over a six-year period and a mean difference in optimism in two samples of women, Swedish and Lithuanian. Data analyses showed varying stability of the studied concepts with the highest stability coefficient being for negative affect and the lowest being for global life satisfaction. Cross-cultural analysis of mean difference in optimism showed that the Swedish women at age 43 reported significantly higher optimism as compared to their Lithuanian counterparts.
    WOS© IF 1.462WOS© AIF 1.462Scopus© SNIP 1.412