Database.use.hdl: https://cris.mruni.eu/cris/handle/007/21527
Now showing 1 - 10 of 375
  • research article; ;
    Schiuma, Giovanni
    European journal of innovation management. Bingley : Emerald, 2022, 27, 1, p. 153-169
    Purpose – This paper aims to model organizational resilience structure. Based on the central insights of the scientific literature, organizational resilience is modelled as the result of an organizational capacity to bounce- back and bounce-forward. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a quantitative empirical study to support the structural perspective of organizational resilience and investigate the relationships among the dimensions to test the above hypothesis by applying confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modelling (SEM) methods. Findings – The results confirmed three models that could be adopted to assess organizational resilience. The first model endorsed endogenous positive interrelationship among all three dimensions. The second model indicated that bounce-back dimensions, i.e. network and leadership and culture, have endogenous effects. Only the leadership and culture dimension is positively associated with a bounce-forward, i.e. change-ready and learning dimension. And the third model demonstrated that the network dimension is linked to leadership and culture, which is linked to the change ready and learning dimension. Originality/value – This study attempts to provide empirical evidence identifying the links between the bounce-back and bounce-forward stages of organizational resilience. These results contribute to the development of organizational resilience theory, confirming the conceptual statements that resilience is the ability to return to the routine and to adapt to the changing environment by overcoming dynamic events, stressing the idea of the importance of enhanced learning capacity, which allows for growth by constantly learning from oneself by gaining unique experiences.
      7WOS© IF 5.1WOS© AIF 6.25Scopus© SNIP 1.861
  • research article;
    Schiuma, Giovanni
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    Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination., p. 1-27.
    Public sector organisations are increasingly tasked to adapt and evolve, dealing with shocks and disturbances without compromising their role as wealth generators. However, as complex adaptive systems, they do not manifest equal capacity for adaptation and evolution in response to complexity. This article explores the role of resilience in public sector organisations and sheds light on the interactions between different elements of resilience that enable these organisations to navigate complexity. The study combines a systematic literature review and a quantitative empirical investigation to propose and test a framework of organisational resilience in the public sector. It identifies planning, adaptation, and enhanced learning as critical phases to explain organisational resilience and how they intervene dynamically when dealing with adversity. The empirical investigation analyses the Lithuanian public sector organisations and explains the relationships among the model dimensions. The paper offers a model for theory development to understand the dimensions of the resilience of complex adaptive public sector organisations and how they interrelate with each other. For practice, it suggests which aspects are relevant to help public sector organisations develop their capacity to build resilience and overcome adversity.
      2WOS© IF 1.1WOS© AIF 3.7Scopus© SNIP 0.924
  • research article
    Mavrikaki, Evangelia
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    Realdon, Giulia
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    Aivelo, Tuomas
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    Bajrami, Ani
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    Dilek Bakanay, Çiçek
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    Beniermann, Anna
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    Blagojević, Jelena
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    Butkevičienė, Eglė
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    Cavadas, Bento
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    Cossu, Costantina
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    Cvetković, Dragana
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    Drobniak, Szymon M.
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    Özgür Durmuş, Zelal
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    Marta Dvořáková, Radka
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    Eens, Marcel
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    Eret, Esra
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    Eroglu, Seckin
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    Anna Gazda, Małgorzata
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    Georgiou, Martha
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    Gostling, Neil J.
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    Gregorčič, Tanja
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    Janštová, Vanda
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    Jenkins, Tania
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    Kervinen, Anttoni
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    Korfiatis, Konstantinos
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    Kuschmierz, Paul
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    Lendvai, Ádám Z.
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    de Lima, Joelyn
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    Miri, Fundime
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    Nogueira, Teresa
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    Panayides, Andreas
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    Paolucci, Sylvia
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    Papadopoulou, Penelope
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    Pessoa, Patrícia
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    Pinxten, Rianne
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    Rios Rocha, Joana
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    Fernández Sánchez, Andrea
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    Siani, Merav
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    Sokoli, Elvisa
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    Sousa, Bruno
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    Stasinakis, Panagiotis K.
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    Torkar, Gregor
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    Varga, Máté
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    Vázquez Ben, Lucía
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    Yarden, Anat
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    Sá-Pinto, Xana
    International journal of science education., p. 1-27.
      5WOS© IF 2.3WOS© AIF 3Scopus© SNIP 1.733
  • research article
    Pašiušienė, Inga
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    Malakaitė, Daiva
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    Žarskienė, Laura
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    Liučvaitienė, Aušra
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    Martišienė, Rita
    Sustainability., p. 1-15.
    Financial technology is quickly developing, making the financial industry more accessible and encouraging individual investor engagement in the investing process. Generation Z, characterised by a high level of digital literacy, curiosity, and receptivity to innovation, tends to very quickly make decisions and rapidly consume. Since 2007, there has been an increase in the number of articles analysing investor behaviour, drawing on insights from financial and psychological theories. The purpose of this exploratory study is to categorise the behaviour of students surveyed by the type of their investments, while at the same time assessing their willingness to choose green investments. The survey used in the analysis not only aims at collecting data but also educates students on the importance of critical self-awareness and the identification of their emotions to make rational, responsible investment decisions and, at the same time, to form a responsible investor who understands that investing is not only a way to earn a return but also can make a positive impact on the world when green investments are chosen. This study shows that studying students tend to be very rational and interested in contributing to greening the world; however, they are still hesitant to put their theoretical skills into practise and are more likely to provide theoretical support for green investments rather than actually invest. Respondents are grouped according to their potential investment behaviour. The proportions of groups are assessed using statistical inference with a precision of 95% that allowed to propose the method of deriving confidence intervals for each group estimation and, thus, making estimates both reliable and available as statistical estimations.
      1WOS© IF 3.9WOS© AIF 5.75Scopus© SNIP 1.198
  • research article
    History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences., p. 1-29.
    This article investigates the origins of the experiences involved in the diagnostics (detection and normative evaluation) of biological entities in imagebased medical praxis. Our specific research aim presupposes a vast discussion regarding the origins of knowledge in general, but is narrowed down to the alternatives of anthropomorphism and biomorphism. Accordingly, in the subsequent chapters we will make an attempt to investigate and illustrate what holds the diagnostic experiential situation together-biological regularities, manifestation via movement, conscious synthesis, causal categories, or something else. We argue that as long as knowledge originates out of practices, a promising way forward is to oscillate between the prominent although controversial ideas of the history of philosophy and observations of concrete human practices, such as, in our chosen example, imagebased medical diagnostics of biological pathologies. Although a number of thinkers are involved in the discussion, Aristotle and Husserl are most important here as the representatives of historical paradigms on the matter. The body in this research was not taken solely as the physical entity (Körper) but rather as a transcendental, constitutive structure where diagnostic and biological processes synchronize in teleological movement (Leib). However, philosophical speculations are illustrated by actual radiograms, the interpretation of which brings us back to the aforementioned question of primacy regarding cognition.
      1WOS© IF 2WOS© AIF 1.433Scopus© SNIP 0.77
  • research article;
    Perlavičiūtė, Goda
    Journal of environmental psychology, p. 114-120
    Environmental values, self-identity and personal norms are relevant factors predicting individuals' environmentally-friendly behaviors. These environmental motivations do not form in solitude but in social interactions, and as such could be shaped by the family context. Yet, we do not know to what extent environmental motivations among family members are related, such as between parents and their adolescent children. Adolescents in particular could potentially hold different environmental motivations than their parents because of age-specific tendencies to rebel against the norms and values of parents and to seek their own unique identity. We studied the relationships between environmental motivations and behaviors in a representative sample of 492 adolescent-parent dyads in Lithuania (N = 984). We found positive relationships between parents' and their adolescent children's environmental values, self-identity and personal norms. Furthermore, adolescents' environmental motivations were associated with parents' pro-environmental behaviors, and parents' environmental motivations were associated with adolescents' pro-environmental behaviors. The study supports and extends the accumulating evidence that environmental motivations, in particular environmental values, self-identity and personal norms, are positively related between parents and their adolescent children and can potentially predict each-others’ pro-environmental behavior.
      7WOS© IF 6.9WOS© AIF 4.45Scopus© SNIP 2.312
  • research article
    Jovanović, Veljko
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    Rudnev, Maksim
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    Abdelrahman, Mohamed
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    Abdul Kadir, Nor Ba'yah
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    Adebayo, Damilola Fisayo
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    Akaliyski, Plamen
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    Alaseel, Rana
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    Alkamali, Yousuf Abdulqader
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    Alonso Palacio, Luz Marina
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    Amin, Azzam
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    Andres, Andrii
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    Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza
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    Aruta, John Jamir Benzon
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    Avanesyan, Hrant M.
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    Ayub, Norzihan
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    Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria
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    Baikanova, Raushan
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    Bakkar, Batoul
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    Bartoluci, Sunčica
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    Benitez, David
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    Bodnar, Ivanna
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    Bolatov, Aidos
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    Borchet, Judyta
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    Bosnar, Ksenija
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    Broche-Pérez, Yunier
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    Buzea, Carmen
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    Cassibba, Rosalinda
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    del Pilar Grazioso, Maria
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    Dhakal, Sandesh
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    Dimitrova, Radosveta
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    Dominguez, Alejandra
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    Duong, Cong Doanh
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    Dutra Thome, Luciana
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    Estavela, Arune Joao
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    Fayankinnu, Emmanuel Abiodun
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    Ferenczi, Nelli
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    Fernández-Morales, Regina
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    Friehs, Maria-Therese
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    Gaete, Jorge
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    Gharz Edine, Wassim
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    Gindi, Shahar
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    Giordani, Rubia Carla Formighieri
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    Gjoneska, Biljana
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    Godoy, Juan Carlos
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    Hancheva, Camellia Doncheva
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    Hapunda, Given
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    Hihara, Shogo
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    Islam, Md. Saiful
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    Janovská, Anna
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    Javakhishvili, Nino
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    Kabir, Russell Sarwar
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    Kabunga, Amir
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    Karakulak, Arzu
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    Karl, Johannes Alfons
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    Katović, Darko
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    Kauyzbay, Zhumaly
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    Kaźmierczak, Maria
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    Khanna, Richa
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    Khosla, Meetu
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    Kisaakye, Peter
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    Klicperova-Baker, Martina
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    Kokera, Richman
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    Kozina, Ana
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    Krauss, Steven E.
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    Landabur, Rodrigo
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    Lefringhausen, Katharina
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    Lewandowska-Walter, Aleksandra
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    Liang, Yun-Hsia
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    Lizarzaburu-Aguinaga, Danny
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    López Steinmetz, Lorena Cecilia
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    Makashvili, Ana
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    Malik, Sadia
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    Manrique-Millones, Denisse
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    Martín-Carbonell, Marta
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    Mattar Yunes, Maria Angela
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    McGrath, Breeda
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    Mechili, Enkeleint A.
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    Mejía Alvarez, Marinés
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    Mhizha, Samson
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    Michałek-Kwiecień, Justyna
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    Mishra, Sushanta Kumar
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    Mohammadi, Mahdi
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    Mohsen, Fatema
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    Moreta-Herrera, Rodrigo
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    Muradyan, Maria D.
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    Musso, Pasquale
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    Naterer, Andrej
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    Nemat, Arash
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    Neto, Félix
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    Neto, Joana
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    Okati-Aliabad, Hassan
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    Orellana, Carlos Iván
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    Orellana, Ligia
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    Park, Joonha
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    Pavlova, Iuliia
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    Peralta, Eddy Alfonso
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    Petrytsa, Petro
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    Pišot, Saša
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    Poláčková Šolcová, Iva
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    Prot, Franjo
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    Ristevska Dimitrovska, Gordana
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    Rivera, Rita M.
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    Dwi Riyanti, Benedicta Prihatin
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    Husain Saiful, Mohd Saiful
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    Samekin, Adil
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    Seisembekov, Telman
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    Sharafi, Zahra
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    Sharma, Prerna
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    Shukla, Shanu
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    Silletti, Fabiola
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    Skrzypińska, Katarzyna
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    Smith-Castro, Vanessa
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    Solomontos-Kountouri, Olga
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    Stanciu, Adrian
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    Ştefenel, Delia
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    Stogianni, Maria
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    Stuart, Jaimee
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    Sudarnoto, Laura Francisca
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    Sultana, Mst Sadia
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    Sulejmanović, Dijana
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    Suryani, Angela Oktavia
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    Tair, Ergyul
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    Tavitian-Elmadjian, Lucy
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    Uka, Fitim
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    Welter Wendt, Guilherme
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    Yang, Pei-Jung
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    Yıldırım, Ebrar
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    Yu, Yue
    Psychological assessment., p. 1-17.
    Coronavirus Anxiety Scale (CAS) is a widely used measure that captures somatic symptoms of coronavirusrelated anxiety. In a large-scale collaboration spanning 60 countries (Ntotal = 21,513), we examined the CAS’s measurement invariance and assessed the convergent validity of CAS scores in relation to the fear of COVID-19 (FCV-19S) and the satisfaction with life (SWLS-3) scales. We utilized both conventional exact invariance tests and alignment procedures, with results revealing that the single-factor model fit the data well in almost all countries. Partial scalar invariance was supported in a subset of 56 countries. To ensure the robustness of results, given the unbalanced samples, we employed resampling techniques both with and without replacement and found the results were more stable in larger samples. The alignment procedure demonstrated a high degree of measurement invariance with 9% of the parameters exhibiting noninvariance. We also conducted simulations of alignment using the parameters estimated in the current model. Findings demonstrated reliability of the means but indicated challenges in estimating the latent variances. Strong positive correlations between CAS and FCV-19S estimated with all three different approaches were found in most countries. Correlations of CAS and SWLS-3 were weak and negative but significantly differed from zero in several countries. Overall, the study provided support for the measurement invariance of the CAS and offered evidence of its convergent validity while also highlighting issues with variance estimation.
      1WOS© IF 3.6WOS© AIF 3.9Scopus© SNIP 2.326
  • research article
    DeLay, Dawn
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    Journal of Youth and Adolescence, p. 1-11
    There is a critical gap in our understanding of how peer relationships contribute to positive youth development. To address this gap the current study uses longitudinal social network data to examine if fun youth were socially desirable, inclusive of peers, and positive agents of social influence during the transition to adolescence. Participants were 210 students (47% female; Mage = 11.55 years at the outset) from 8 classes in 3 schools in a small Lithuanian city. Each child received a fun score consisting of nominations from classmates as “someone who is fun to be around”. Participants also nominated up to five classmates as friends. Fun students received more friendship nominations than their peers and they maintained higher levels of social desirability over time. Fun youth appeared to be inclusive of their peers in that fun youth did not appear to have preferences to befriend only those like themselves. The friends of fun youth were positively influenced such that they were perceived to be more fun over time. The findings suggests that fun youth may promote positive social change within peer groups.
      5WOS© IF 4.9WOS© AIF 3.6Scopus© SNIP 2.212
  • research article;
    Kiuru, Noona
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    Silinskas, Gintautas
    Learning and individual differences, p. [1-12]
    The present study investigated the interplay between teachers' (n = 40) and parents' (n = 606) self-reported quantity (frequency of help), and quality (positive affect while assisting a child) of academic support and teacher rated children's task persistence (n = 647). In the fall semester of Grade 2 children completed academic performance tests. Teachers and parents filled out questionnaires in the fall and spring semesters of Grade 2. First, the results showed that the frequency of teachers' and parents' help did not significantly predict teacher perceived children's task persistence, whereas teachers' and parents' positive affect while assisting a child contributed to the children's higher task persistence. Second, the results revealed that the effect of the frequency of teachers' help on teacher perceived children's task persistence is moderated by their positive affect while assisting a child. Finally, teachers and parents responded to lower children's task persistence by providing more frequent help, and parents responded with more positive affect when children's task persistence was high. Educational relevance statement: The current study confirms that both home and school contexts play a meaningful role in second graders' task persistence development by simultaneously taking into account the effect of the quantity (frequency of help) and quality (positive affect) of teachers' and parents' academic support. Results suggest that teachers' and parents' quality of academic support (positive affect) is critical in shaping more persistent children's behavior with the tasks according to the teachers' reports. Meanwhile, while the frequency of help seems not to have a unique effect on teacher perceived children's task persistence, it appears significant in interaction with teachers' positive affect, indicating that children remain the most persistent with the tasks when teachers are high in positive affect (joy and satisfaction) and low in the frequency of help. Further, as teachers' and parents' academic support is significant for teacher perceived children's task persistence, teacher perceived children's task persistence also seems to be an important factor in evoking teachers' and parents' academic support. Specifically, low children's task persistence triggers more frequent help from teachers with classwork and from parents with homework. In terms of positive affect, higher children's task persistence evokes more joy and satisfaction only for parents. Thus, the reciprocal associations investigation of two different teachers' and parents' academic support dimensions provide a better understanding of how both teachers and parents together can support children's task persistence during Grade 2. In sum, teachers and parents should monitor how frequently they offer help to children, focusing more on keeping a positive learning atmosphere by demonstrating joy and satisfaction.
      5WOS© IF 3.6WOS© AIF 3.2Scopus© SNIP 1.741
  • research article
    Vainauskienė, Vestina
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    International journal of health planning and management, p. 1-20
    Patient‐led online health communities (OHCs) consist of empowered patients who are more likely to share higher levels of knowledge: conceptual and procedural knowledge. In patient‐led OHCs knowledge is shared via the short path and there exists the practice of sharing inadequate knowledge. Patient knowledge sharing activity is the highest in the mitotic phase of the patient‐led OHC life cycle. The nature of queries generated in OHCs can indicate to stakeholders the gap between the medical information patients receive and the medical information they want, the level of patient empowerment and the need for patient empowerment knowledge.
      1WOS© IF 2.7WOS© AIF 3.6Scopus© SNIP 0.906