Database.use.hdl: https://cris.mruni.eu/cris/handle/007/21484
Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • research article
    Padilla-Walker, Laura M.
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    Van der Graaff, Jolien
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    Workman, Katey
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    Carlo, Gustavo
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    Branje, Susan
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    Carrizales, Alexia
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    Gerbino, Maria
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    Gülseven, Zehra
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    Hawk, Skyler T.
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    Luengo Kanacri, Paula
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    Mesurado, Belén
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    Samper-García, Paula
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    Shen, Yuh-Ling
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    Taylor, Laura K.
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    Trach, Jessica
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    van Zalk, Maarten H. W.
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    International journal of behavioral development. London : Sage Publications, 2022, 00, 00., p. 1-11
    Evidence suggests an impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health, particularly among emerging adults. However, theories on altruism born of suffering or adversarial growth suggest that we might also see prosocial behavior as a function of the pandemic, which may protect against mental health challenges. Because cultural values are central in determining prosocial behavior, the current study explored how cultural values were differentially associated with adaptive prosocial behaviors that might protect against mental health challenges. Participants for the current study included 5,682 young people aged 18–25 years from 14 different countries around the world (68% female, 62% college students). Path analyses suggested that there were few differences in patterns as a function of culture, but revealed that horizontal individualism and horizontal and vertical collectivism were indirectly associated with lower levels of depression via prosocial behavior toward family members. Discussion focuses on the importance of coping by strengthening family relationships via prosocial behavior during the pandemic.
      1WOS© IF 3.7WOS© AIF 3.6Scopus© SNIP 1.626
  • research article; ;
    Journal of interpersonal violence. Thousand Oaks : Sage Publication, 2021, 00, 00., p. 1-22
    The current study used a person-oriented approach to investigate (a) potential distinctive groups of women survivors of IPV based on their posttraumatic growth (PTG), centrality of event, resilience, and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) patterns, and (b) examine the role of sociodemographic (age, education, work status) and violence related (physical and emotional violence, time since last violence episode, psychological help) factors in distinguishing these groups. The study sample consisted of 421 women survivors of IPV, and latent profile analysis revealed four profiles: “negative impact” (11% of the sample), “positive growth” (46%), “low impact” (18%), and “distressed growth” (25%). Women age, education, received psychological help, frequency of physical and emotional violence, and time since last violence incident significantly distinguished some of the indicated profiles from each other. Findings of this study contribute to the existing literature by identifying different responses to IPV and investigating some of the theoretical assumptions that had not been comprehensively analyzed in the IPV literature. Limitations of the study and implications for future research are discussed.
    WOS© IF 2.621WOS© AIF 3.168Scopus© SNIP 2.529
  • research article
    Sorgente, Angela
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    Lanz, Margherita
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    Serido, Joyce
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    Shim, Soeyon
    International journal of behavioral development. London : Sage Publications Ltd., 2020, vol. 44, iss. 6, UNSP 0165025420914986., p. 565-574
    The transition from financial dependence on one's parents to financial self-sufficiency is one of the most relevant transitions during emerging adulthood. It is important to have an instrument able to assess emerging adults' financial capabilities and to detect its change over time. The current article aims to collect international evidence of the Financial Identity Scale (FIS) validity and reliability. Cross-sectional data collected from 2,501 emerging adults aged 18-25 and belonging to three different countries-U.S. (n ¼ 1,535), Italy (n ¼ 485), and Lithuania (n ¼ 481)-were adopted to test score structure validity, generalizability, sensitivity to difference, criterion-related validity, and internal consistency. Instead, four-wave longitudinal data, available for the American sample only (n ¼ 1,900), were adopted to test FIS structural stability and sensitivity to change. As recommended by the contemporary view of validity, different structural equation models were performed. Findings suggest that FIS scores are valid and reliable. The implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed.
    WOS© IF 2.48WOS© AIF 3.585Scopus© SNIP 1.263
  • research article; ;
    Bergman, Lars R.
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    Journal of interpersonal violence. Thousand Oaks : Sage Publication, 2021, vol. 36, iss. 15-16., p. 7599-7624
    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of social support for posttraumatic growth (PTG) and identity processes in a sample of 217 women victims of intimate partner violence (IPV), recruited from women shelters, social support centers, and through counseling psychologists. The results of the study highlight the important role of social support in seeking positive personal resolutions after experiencing traumatic events of IPV. It indicates that social support, but not social nonsupport, predicts higher levels of PTG and the development of new positive identities. In particular, social support was positively associated with the manifestation of all five identity processes, that is, with identification with commitment, commitment making, exploration in breadth, exploration in depth, and ruminative exploration. Furthermore, contextual and socioeconomic factors, such as time after last violence, relationships with the perpetrator, place of residence, education, and age of the victims of IPV were also related to identity processes. Severity of the violence, time after the last violence, education, and personal income were related to PTG. Thus, this study indicated that there are significant contextual and socioeconomic differences in the PTG and reconsideration of one’s identity. Recommendations for practitioners and future research have been suggested.
    WOS© IF 3.573WOS© AIF 2.073Scopus© SNIP 1.797