Database.use.hdl: https://cris.mruni.eu/cris/handle/007/21560
Now showing 1 - 10 of 165
  • conference paper
    Kupriyanov, Oleksandr
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    Dichev, Dimitar
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    Hrinchenko, Hanna
    Springer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH, 2024
    An experimental study was performed to investigate the effect of macrogeometric parameters of the mating surface forms on the strength of the cylindrical interference fit joint: taper, bow, barrel, and ovality. Fifteen couplings were made with a nominal diameter of 60 mm and a mating surface length of 70 mm. The bushings had a regular cylindrical form, and the CNC machining of shafts caused the geometry error. The relative geometric accuracy of the form was assumed to be the maximum allowable and was up to 60% of the tolerance zone. During modeling, the minimum allowable interference fit in the coupling Ø60 H8/u8 was assumed to be 0.04 mm to enhance the effect of form geometry errors. Ranked assembly was used to compensate for the interference fit in joints. The joints were assembled using thermal assembly. The strength was determined by axial pressing on the press with the press diagram recorded. The experiment results showed that form geometry error with maximum allowable values significantly affects the strength of the cylindrical interference fit. The taper reduces the strength to 0.87, barrel to 0.8, bow to 0.59, and ovality to 0.79 of coupling with perfect cylindrical surface geometry. Comparison of experimental results with those previously obtained by finite element modeling showed good agreement, within 10%. It is recommended that for critical couplings, a stricter limitation of the geometric error of the mating surfaces shall be provided.
      4Scopus© SNIP 0.229
  • research article
    Karakulak, Arzu
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    Tepe, Beyza
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    Dimitrova, Radosveta
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    Abdelrahman, Mohamed
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    Akaliyski, Plamen
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    Alaseel, Rana
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    Alkamali, Yousuf Abdulqader
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    Amin, Azzam
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    Lizarzaburu Aguinaga, Danny A.
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    Andres, Andrii
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    Aruta, John Jamir Benzon R.
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    Assiotis, Marios
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    Avanesyan, Hrant
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    Ayub, Norzihan
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    Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria
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    Baikanova, Raushan
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    Bakkar, Batoul
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    Bartoluci, Sunčica
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    Benitez, David
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    Bodnar, Ivanna
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    Bolatov, Aidos
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    Borchet, Judyta
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    Bosnar, Ksenija
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    Broche-Pérez, Yunier
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    Buzea, Carmen
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    Cassibba, Rosalinda
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    Carbonell, Marta Martín
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    Chen, Bin-Bin
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    Dimitrovska, Gordana Ristevska
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    Công Doanh, Dương
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    Dominguez Espinosa, Alejandra del Carmen
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    Edine, Wassim Gharz
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    Ferenczi, Nelli
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    Fernández-Morales, Regina
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    Gaete, Jorge
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    Gan, Yiqun
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    Giolo, Suely
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    Giordani, Rubia Carla Formighieri
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    Friehs, Maria-Therese
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    Gindi, Shahar
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    Gjoneska, Biljana
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    Godoy, Juan Carlos
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    del Pilar Grazioso, Maria
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    Hancheva, Camellia
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    Hapunda, Given
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    Hihara, Shogo
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    Husain, Mohd Saiful
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    Islam, Md Saiful
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    Janovská, Anna
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    Javakhishvili, Nino
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    Jovanović, Veljko
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    Kabir, Russell Sarwar
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    Abdul Kadir, Nor Ba’yah
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    Karl, Johannes
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    Katović, Darko
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    Kauyzbay, Zhumaly
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    Kawashima, Tinka Delakorda
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    Kazmierczak, Maria
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    Khanna, Richa
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    Khosla, Meetu
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    Klicperová-Baker, Martina
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    Kozina, Ana
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    Krauss, Steven Eric
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    Landabur, Rodrigo
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    Lefringhausen, Katharina
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    Lewandowska-Walter, Aleksandra
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    Liang, Yun-Hsia
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    Makashvili, Ana
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    Malik, Sadia
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    Manrique-Millones, Denisse
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    Mastrotheodoros, Stefanos
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    McGrath, Breeda
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    Mechili, Enkeleint A.
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    Mejía, Marinés
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    Mhizha, Samson
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    Michalek-Kwiecien, Justyna
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    Miconi, Diana
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    Mohsen, Fatema
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    Moreta-Herrera, Rodrigo
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    Muhl, Camila
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    Muradyan, Maria
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    Musso, Pasquale
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    Naterer, Andrej
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    Nemat, Arash
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    Neto, Felix
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    Neto, Joana
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    Palacio, Luz Marina Alonso
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    Okati-Aliabad, Hassan
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    Orellana, Carlos Iván
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    Orellana, Ligia María
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    Mishra, Sushanta Kumar
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    Park, Joonha
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    Pavlova, Iuliia
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    Peralta, Eddy
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    Petrytsa, Petro
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    Pišot, Saša
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    Prot, Franjo
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    Rasia, José
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    Rivera, Rita
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    Riyanti, Benedicta Prihatin Dwi
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    Samekin, Adil
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    Seisembekov, Telman
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    Silletti, Fabiola
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    Sharma, Prerna
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    Shukla, Shanu
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    Skrzypińska, Katarzyna
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    Šolcová, Iva Poláčková
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    Solomontos-Kountouri, Olga
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    Stanciu, Adrian
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    Stefenel, Delia
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    Steinmetz, Lorena Cecilia López
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    Stogianni, Maria
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    Stuart, Jaimee
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    Sudarnoto, Laura Francisca
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    Sugimura, Kazumi
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    Sultana, Sadia
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    Suryani, Angela Oktavia
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    Tair, Ergyul
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    Tavitian-Elmadjan, Lucy
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    Thome, Luciana Dutra
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    Uka, Fitim
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    Walter, Brett
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    Wendt, Guilherme W.
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    Yang, Pei-Jung
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    Yıldırım, Ebrar
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    Yu, Yue
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    Yunes, Maria Angela Mattar
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    Zanoni da Silva, Milene
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    Rudnev, Maksim
    Communications Psychology., p. 1-16.
    With the COVID-19 pandemic, behavioural scientists aimed to illuminate reasons why people comply with (or not) large-scale cooperative activities. Here we investigated the motives that underlie support for COVID-19 preventive behaviours in a sample of 12,758 individuals from 34 countries. We hypothesized that the associations of empathic prosocial concern and fear of disease with support towards preventive COVID-19 behaviours would be moderated by trust in the government. Results suggest that the association between fear of disease and support for COVID-19 preventive behaviours was strongest when trust in the government was weak (both at individual- and country-level). Conversely, the association with empathic prosocial concern was strongest when trust in the government was high, but this moderation was only found at individual-level scores of governmental trust. We discuss how motivations may be shaped by socio-cultural context, and outline how findings may contribute to a better understanding of collective action during global crises.
      3
  • book part
    Pereira Lucas, Eugénio
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    Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2023
    The chapter deals with the issues related to cross-border enforcement and due process in Lithuania and Portugal. It analyses how the concept of due process is defined by the national courts in both countries in cross-border civil cases and whether this interpretation is compatible with the case law of the European Court on Human Rights and Article 6 of the European Convention of Human Rights with establishes the general requirements of the right to a fair trial. Particularly the authors focus on the common problems of due process which arise in cross-border situation, such as service of documents, proper notification (summoning) of court hearings and equality of arms. The problems of service of documents arise when the national courts use methods of service of documents which results not in the direct service of documents to the addressee, but other persons. The authors found that pursuant to the national case law when assessing the appropriateness of service of documents in such cases, it must be determined whether the addressee was actually aware of the court proceeding initiated in a foreign country. Furthermore, the author analyze the application of public policy clause as the ground for non-recognition of judgments. The interpretation of the public policy clause by the national courts in Lithuania and Portugal is narrow. Lithuanian and Portuguese case law distinguish between proce- dural and substantive public policy. In practice procedural public policy is of great importance while substantive public policy does not play any considerable role. The authors found that the content of public policy is interpreted in accordance with the international principles of due process set out in the case law of the European Court on Human Rights and the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union.
      2Scopus© SNIP 0
  • book part
    Cham : Springer, 2023
    Impeachment is a specific form of constitutional liability, including the removal of the highest state officials from constitutional duties. This constitutional institution, having originated centuries ago, remains relevant today and raises many questions regarding its legal or political origin. The constitutions of many states consolidate certain elements of impeachment; however, the chosen impeachment models can differ and could be closer to the political or legal constitutional framework that determines the role of the (constitutional) courts. The Lithuanian impeachment model consolidates cooperation between the Parliament and the Constitutional Court in deciding impeachment issues. The period from 2004 to 2017 witnessed the adoption by the Lithuanian Constitutional Court of highly important acts in which the issue of constitutional liability was considerably elaborated. The entry is intended to examine the constitutional doctrine and relevant case law of the Lithuanian Constitutional Court.
      2
  • research article;
    European business organization law review. Springer, 2023., p. 1-32
    For many years, paper was the main format for the registration of companies. The Digitalisation Directive, adopted in 2019, obliged European Union (EU) Member States to provide founders with the option to form private companies digitally. Although for Lithuania, where online formation of legal entities had already existed even before 2019, these regulatory developments did not bring about radical change, they forced the national legislator to introduce the required amendments. This article aims at studying the provisions of the Digitalisation Directive and the results of its implementation in Lithuania to suggest possible improvements in the online registration of companies. The laws of both EU jurisdictions (Estonia, Latvia, and Poland) and one non-EU jurisdiction (Ukraine) with experience of online registration of companies are investigated in comparison with Lithuanian law. In addition, the results of a survey Among Lithuanian law firms are presented and contribute to the analysis and interpretation of the legislation at hand. The article’s conclusions about the state of implementation of the Digitalisation Directive and the recommended steps beyond the Directive’s transposition provide for further enhancement of statutes and practices in this area.
    WOS© IF 2.1WOS© AIF 4.2Scopus© SNIP 1.119
  • book
    Nowak, Maciej J.
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    Mitrea, Andrei
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    Lukstiņa, Gunta
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    Petrişor, Alexandru-Ionuţ
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    Filepné Kovács, Krisztina
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    Simeonova, Velislava
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    Yanchev, Pavel
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    Jürgenson, Evelin
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    Põdra, Kätlin
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    Řezáč, Vít
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    Ladzianska, Zuzana
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    Baloga, Martin
    2023
      2
  • book part;
    Nature-Based Solutions for Flood Mitigation: Environmental and Socio-Economic Aspects : [monograph] / editors: Ferreira, C.S.S., Kalantari, Z., Hartmann, T., Pereira, P.. Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2022. ISBN 9783030775049., p. 469-487
    Floods are natural phenomena that cannot be avoided. Lately, next to the traditional grey infrastructure, countries have started implementing nature-based solutions (NBS) for flood management. NBS need more land than traditional measures, and this land often belongs to private persons. This chapter aims to analyze what are the possibilities to implement NBS on private land. Usually, the governments can achieve their goals using policy instruments that are called “stick,” “carrots,” and “sermons.” In terms of NBS “sticks” are expropriation and land-use restrictions, “carrots” – financial incentives, including payments for ecosystem services, and “sermons” – informational measures. Implementation of “sticks” from the legal perspective is the most complicated because it interferes with property rights protected internationally as human rights. The latter is not absolute, and the state can expropriate or restrict land-use provided the aim of this interference is justified, lawful, and proportionate. “Carrots” can be effective; however, they require long-term investments from the state. Whereas “sermons” are rather supplementary instruments supporting the implementation of “sticks” and “carrots.”.
      1
  • research article; ;
    European business organization law review. [Heidelberg] : Springer, 2022, vol. 23., p. 455-479
    Little has been achieved at the EU level and internationally to harmonise the various approaches taken by national laws regarding the nature and extent of directors’ obligations in the vicinity of insolvency. The first steps towards harmonisation can be seen in the Restructuring Directive, which aims to provide initial guidance on the duties of directors where there is a likelihood of insolvency. Lithuania is one of the countries which has most recently implemented a comprehensive insolvency reform, trying to better conform to the modern realities of business and promote the corporate rescue paradigm through the national legal regime. The new Law on Insolvency of Legal Persons introduced a range of changes that directly and indirectly impact the director’s civil liability approach. The aim of this paper is to provide comprehensive insights from a comparative perspective on the Lithuanian approach to the regime of a director’s civil liability in the vicinity of insolvency through an analysis of the conditions and sources of such liability in the context of the new legal regime of insolvency. The paper discusses the general features and doctrine of the legal regime regarding a director’s civil liability in Lithuania. Secondly, it sets out the types of insolvency-related duties of directors, analyses the current state of harmonisation at the EU level in that regard, and then discusses the Lithuanian approach. Finally, it determines the main factors influencing the future of the legal regime of a director’s liability, including the reactions of the legislators to the COVID-19 outbreak.
      3WOS© IF 2.1WOS© AIF 4.2Scopus© SNIP 1.119