Database.use.hdl: https://cris.mruni.eu/cris/handle/007/20926
Now showing 1 - 10 of 52
  • research article
    Feng, Siyuan
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    Ding, Jingyi
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    Zhan, Tianyu
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    Zhao, Wenwu
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    Land degradation & development. John Wiley & Sons, 2022, 00, 00., p. 1-4
    The arid and semiarid grassland ecosystems are characterized by limited water resources and are generally vulnerable to climate change. Understanding how plants in arid and semiarid ecosystems respond to global climatic variation is crucial for ecological restoration under a changing climate. Although the effects of climate on aboveground biomass (AGB) and belowground biomass (BGB) have been widely explored, how AGB and BGB respond to climatic variation is seldom disentangled. There is still a need to understand how plant communities respond to global climate change. In this study, we conducted a transect survey across grasslands in Inner Mongolia to capture changes in AGB and BGB in plant communities. Then, we used structural equation modelling (SEM) to explore the relationship between environmental factors and the root:shoot ratio to understand how plant communities respond to ecological drought under global climate change. Our results showed that low precipitation use efficiency (LPUE) results in a high root:shoot (HRS) ratio, and BGB was more sensitive to environmental changes. By contrast, high precipitation use efficiency (HPUE) led to a low root:shoot (LRS) ratio, and environmental factors had a greater impact on AGB. For the LPUE pattern, soil water content (SWC), pH, and soil total nitrogen (STN) mainly affected the HRS ratio. Soil water content and STN influenced the HRS ratio through a positive effect on BGB. For the HPUE pattern, SWC, STN, and plant abundance (PA) predominantly regulate the LRS ratio, while biodiversity (plant abundance) affects the LRS ratio by positively affecting AGB. Our results highlight the differential impact of precipitation use efficiency on aboveground and belowground biomass allocation. This is important for monitoring the impact of drought events on plant biomass, improving productivity assessment models in arid and semi-arid regions, and assessing local carbon storage accurately.
    WOS© IF 4.7WOS© AIF 5.55Scopus© SNIP 1.256
  • research article
    Delač, Domina
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    Kisić, Ivica
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    Zgorelec, Željka
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    Perčin, Aleksandra
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    Catena. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2022, vol. 218., p. 269-281
    Slash-pile burning is a frequent land management practice implemented across the Mediterranean. However, the impact of this practice on runoff waters has often been neglected. To address this issue, two experimental burns were conducted: one with moderate (MS) severity, and another with high (HS) severity, to evaluate the impact of different types of slash–pile on the quality of runoff waters. An unburned (UB) treatment was also considered in this study, to evaluate the impacts of slash–pile burning per se. Treatments were established on a slope terrain (∼18°) characteristic of the Adriatic coast. During the two-year study, runoff and erosion samples were collected 22 times after major rainfall events. Aside from runoff, erosion, and total carbon in sediments (TC) were determined, as well as various water quality parameters, including, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), and Br¯, Cl¯, SO4 2¯, PO4 3¯, F¯, K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+. Overall, water quality parameters were more affected shortly after burning, while runoff and erosion were more dependent on precipitation patterns. TC in sediments was higher in HS than in MS, the highest values being observed in the last sampling events for both burned treatments. Regarding runoff water quality, the effects were more pronounced at HS, even if the hydrological response was stronger at the MS. The UB treatment showed significant changes in runoff water quality following major rain events, which was attributed to soil saturation. Our results suggest that slash pile burning has adverse effects on runoff waters, so it is recommended for biomass to be used in other ways, especially in the context of soil and water conservation.
    WOS© IF 6.2WOS© AIF 4.433Scopus© SNIP 1.694
  • research article;
    Meidutė-Kavaliauskienė, Ieva
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    Činčikaitė, Renata
    Sustainability. Basel : MDPI, 2021, vol. 13, iss. 15, 8383., p. 1-19
    The process of companies undertaking adaptation in the face of changing conditions which have been influenced by factors such as globalisation, technological changes, environmental changes, competition, political decisions, worker mobility, population structure, and so on, is one of the major challenges of modern corporate governance. Changes in a company are inevitable, but they do not always directly correlate with the employee’s sense of security, including whether the employee feels safe about their workplace, in-come, of future roles in the company in the face of potential changes. There is an inverse relationship between the employee’s sense of security and their time spent with the company. One way of managing this which can help to ensure a sense of security for employees within the company is to directly involve them in the process of implementing changes in the organisation. The main goal of this paper is to highlight the principal aspects of employee engagement in change management processes and to gain an increased level of understanding in terms of the implementation of change at the organisational level by involving employees. Research methods: a systematic and comparative analysis of concepts and methods which have been published in the available scientific literature, statistical processing, an instrumental case study, interviews, surveys, and a content analysis of strategic documents; followed by modelling. The theoretical contribution of the paper demonstrates construction of methodology quidded on the Emergent perspective and new theoretical insights on professional discourse. Practical input shows that employee involvement in change processes is directly related to the speed of strategic change in the company
    WOS© IF 3.889WOS© AIF 5.729Scopus© SNIP 1.31
  • research article;
    Ferreira, Carla
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    Kalantari, Zahra
    Journal of Environmental Management. [London] : Elsevier, 2021, vol. 277, January, 111458., p. 1-4
    WOS© IF 8.91WOS© AIF 6.309Scopus© SNIP 1.907
  • research article
    Zhao, Sen
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    Wu, Xiuqin
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    Zhou, Jinxing
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    Science of the total environment. Amsterdam : Elsevier, 2021, vol. 752, 15 January, 141770., p. 1394-1404
    Vegetation recovery and poverty alleviation are critical problems in the karst national designed poor counties (NPDC) in southwest China. However, little information is available about the relationship between poverty and vegetation dynamics in these areas. In this study, we used remote sensing and statistical datasets from 2000 to 2015 to identify the relations between vegetation dynamics and poverty among the NPDC in southwest rocky desertification areas. We estimated the vegetation dynamics using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and poverty with the rural per capita net income. Local indicator of spatial association and the space-time transition type of poverty were applied to identify spatial patterns of the poverty spatial distribution relationship and transition. Also, poverty, natural and ecological governance factors were assessed using the Geo-detector method to uncover the driving factors of karst vegetation. The results showed that vegetation increased significantly (p < 0.05) in karst NPDC (82.82%) and rocky desertification control counties (78.77%). The karst NPDC was significantly clustered. The hot spots of rural per capita net income changed from west and north (2000) to only north (2015) and cold spots changed from east and south (2000) to only south (2015). The rural per capita net income spatiotemporal transition was higher in 2000 than in 2015. We found a weak synergy between vegetation change and poverty type transition in 42.86% of the browning counties, 45.45% in the slowly greening counties, and 43.65% in stable greening counties. However, 57.50% of counties in the quick greening counties showed a tradeoff relationship with the poverty type transition. The rocky desertification rate and ecological engineering measures affected vegetation dynamics importantly. The results will help decision-makers to understand the interdependence between vegetation and poverty. This will contribute to better policies formulation to tackle poverty in the karst rocky desertification area.
      2WOS© IF 10.753WOS© AIF 6.309Scopus© SNIP 2.175
  • research article
    Telak, Leon Josip
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    Ferreira, Carla
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    Filipovic, Vilim
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    Filipovic, Lana
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    Bogunovic, Igor
    Water. Basel : MDPI, 2020, vol. 12, iss. 11, 3295., p. 1-16
    Tillage is well known to have impacts on soil properties and hydrological responses. This work aims to study the short-term impacts of tillage (0–3 months) on soil and hydrological responses in fig orchards located in Croatia. Understanding the soil hydrological response in the study area is crucial for soil management due to frequent autumn floods. The hydrological response was investigated using rainfall simulation experiments (58 mm h−1, for 30 min, over 0.785 m2 plots). The results show that the bulk density was significantly higher 3 months after tillage than at 0 and 1 months. The water holding capacity and amount of soil organic matter decreased with time. The water runoff and phosphorous loss (P loss) increased over time. The sediment concentration (SC) was significantly higher 3 months after tillage than in the previous monitoring periods, while sediment loss (SL) and carbon loss (C loss) were significantly lower 0 months after tillage than 3 months after tillage. Overall, there was an increase in soil erodibility with time (high SC, SL, C loss, and P loss), attributed to the precipitation patterns that increase the soil water content and therefore the hydrological response. Therefore, sustainable agricultural practices are needed to avoid sediment translocation and to mitigate floods and land degradation
    WOS© IF 3.103WOS© AIF 4.463Scopus© SNIP 1.179
  • research article
    Francos, Marcos
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    Úbeda, Xavier
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    Journal of forestry research. Harbin : Northeast Forestry University, 2020, vol. 31, iss. 1., p. 269-278
    Studies of post-fire soil status in Mediterranean ecosystems are common; however, few have examined the effects of long-term forest management after a wildfire on physicochemical soil properties. Here, we analyzed differences in soil properties attributable to long-term post-fire management and assessed the sustainability of these management practices in relation to the soil properties. The study area is located in Ódena in the northeast region of the Iberian Peninsula consisted of the control forest (burned more than 30 years ago), low density forest (LD; burned in a wildfire in 1986 and managed in 2005) and high density forest (HD; burned in a wildfire in 1986 and no managed). For soils from each plot, we measured soil water repellency, aggregate stability, total nitrogen (TN), soil organic matter (SOM), inorganic carbon (IC), pH, electrical conductivity, extractable calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium (K), phosphorus, aluminum (Al), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), zinc, copper, boron, chrome, silicon and sulfur and calculated the ratios of C/N, Ca + Mg/(Na + K)1/2, Ca/Al and Ca/Mg. Significant differences were found in TN, IC, SOM, pH, K, Al, Mn, Fe and C/N ratio (p < 0.05). All soil properties were found to have largely recovered their pre-fire values. Soils were affected by the post-fire management practices implemented 20 years after the fire, as reflected in their respective physicochemical properties, so that soil properties at the control and LD sites are more similar today than those at the control and HD sites. Thus, sustainable forest management can overcome soil degradation in areas affected by wildfire in the medium- and long-term by improving soil properties.
    WOS© IF 2.149WOS© AIF 2.576Scopus© SNIP 0.908
  • research article
    Bogunovic, Igor
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    Galic, Marija
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    Bilandzija, Darija
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    Kisic, Ivica
    Environmental earth sciences. [Heidelberg] : Springer, 2020, vol. 79, iss. 3, 70., p. 1-6
    A 2-year study was carried out in a Croatia to assess the impacts of tillage and fertilisation on soil bulk density (BD), penetration resistance (PR), CO2 emissions and grain yields. The tillage treatments were: conventional tillage (CT), minimum tillage (MT) and reduced tillage (RT). Inside these plots, subplots were fertilised with organic fertiliser, 600 kg ha−1 (CF), 15 t ha−1 (FYM15) and 30 t ha−1 (FYM30) of farmyard manure. In 2017, BD at 10–20 cm was significantly higher in MT than in RT and CT. The same was observed in 2018 at 0–10 cm and 10–20 cm. In 2017, RT had a significantly lower PR than MT and CT. In 2018, PR in RT was significantly lower than MT. In 2017 and 2018 FYM30 and FYM15 application decreased significantly BD in comparison to CF. In 2017, the highest dose of farmyard manure (FYM30 50, 5 kg ha−1 day−1) increased significantly CO2 fluxes comparing to CF (40.7 kg ha−1 day−1). Soil CO2 fluxes under CT (47.9 and 52.3 kg ha−1 day−1 in 2017 and 2018, respectively) were significantly higher than RT (39.1 kg ha−1 day−1) in 2017 and MT (41.7 kg ha−1 day−1) in 2018. Conventional tillage (2.26 t ha−1) had significant lower oat yields than RT (2.72 t ha−1) and MT (2.56 t ha−1). The opposite occurred in barley yields. Farmyard manure significantly increased oat yields in 2017 compared to CF. Overall, reduced tillage with addition of FYM30 can be considered a sustainable management practice, since improved soil physical properties, reduced CO2 fluxes and increased grain yield.
    WOS© IF 2.784WOS© AIF 4.237Scopus© SNIP 1.11
  • research article
    Bogunovic, Igor
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    Telak, Leon Josip
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    Filipovic, Vilim
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    Filipovic, Lana
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    Durdevic, Boris
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    Percin, Aleksandra
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    Birkás, Márta
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    Dekemati, Igor
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    Rodrigo Comino, Jesus
    Journal of hydrology and hydromechanics. Warsaw : De Gruyter ; Institute of Hydrology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, 2020, vol. 68, iss. 4., p. 328-337
    This research aims to assess the impacts of soil use management on runoff, soil losses, and their main soil controls in vegetable cropland (CROP), tilled olives (OT), and grass-covered olive orchards (OGC) on Leptosol in Croatia. Soil analysis and rainfall simulation experiments were conducted to quantify runoff (Run), soil, and nutrient losses. Bulk density (BD) was significantly higher at OT plots, in addition to the CROP plots. Water-stable aggregates (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD), and soil organic matter (OM) were significantly higher in OGC plots compared to the other land uses. Run and soil loss (SL) were significantly higher in CROP and OT plots compared to the OGC plots. The CROP plots showed soil management that can be considered as unsustainable with 52, 68- and 146-times higher losses of phosphorus (P loss), nitrogen (N loss), and carbon (C loss) compared to the OGC plots. The principal component analysis showed that MWD was associated with vegetation cover (VC), water-holding capacity (WHC), WSA, OM, total nitrogen (TN), time to ponding (TP), and time to runoff (TR). These variables were negatively related to P2O5, Run, SL, and P, N, and C loss. Results indicate the need for the adoption of conservation strategies in croplands and olive orchards.
      2WOS© IF 5.023WOS© AIF 3.724Scopus© SNIP 1.582
  • research article
    Zhao, Sen
    ;
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    Wu, Xiuqin
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    Zhou, Jinxing
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    Cao, Jianhua
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    Zhang, Weixin
    Ecological indicators. [Amsterdam] : Elsevier, 2020, vol. 113, June, 106208., p. 1-11
    The vegetation in karst regions (KR) is crucial to maintain fragile local ecosystems. Therefore, it is critical to understand the factors that affect their vitality. The objective of this work is to study global KR vegetation dynamics between 1986 and 2015 and the natural and anthropogenic factors that affect it. The results showed a significantly (p < 0.05) positive greening trend (greening and browning trends were estimated to be 31.90% and 14.29%, respectively). The recuperation of KR vegetation was mainly observed at high latitudes and equatorial regions, where there is less human influence. Nevertheless, the growth of vegetation in some middle and low latitudes areas was a consequence of the human intervention. Vegetation degradation in KR was especially observed at middle latitudes due to the harsh environment and human impact. No significant correlation was observed between karst vegetation stability, the variation of annual average temperature and precipitation accumulated. Globally, karst vegetation dynamics depend more on precipitation than in temperature. In some areas, vegetation can recover gradually, even under extreme conditions and without human intervention. In areas with high population density, vegetation recuperation is mainly as a consequence of restoring programs.
    WOS© IF 4.958WOS© AIF 5.201Scopus© SNIP 1.644